Archive for the 'Frost Hardy Plants' Category

Dampiera rosmarinifolia

Dampiera rosmarinifolia

Dampiera rosmarinifolia

I found another good photo of this suckering plant which spreads by underground shoots form the root stock. It is a good hardy plant to have in a perennial border. It is easily kept confined.

It is drought tolerant and frost hardy and grows in lime soils.

Acacia iteaphylla (Flinders Range Wattle)

Acacia iteaphylla (Flinders Range Wattle)

Acacia iteaphylla (Flinders Range Wattle)

Acacia iteaphylla is also called the Gawler Range Wattle, or the Port Lincoln Wattle, indicating how wide spread in the wild these are.

This is one of my favourite wattles. I’ve had a hedge of them for over 20 years, and here they are the first to flower, beginning in Autumn. I noticed another hedge of them in the town in good bloom. This uaually means that there hasn’t been much rain here because the blooms spoil in the rain.

Well grown plants reach 3-5m tall by 3-6m wide. They have pale yellow sprays of flowers and can be pruned. It is very adaptable and is drought resistant and lime tolerant. Some forms have pretty new growth, and can be pendulous or upright in growth habit. Use as an ornamental or low windbreak as well as a hedge.

Eremophila glabra ‘Roseworthy’

Eremophila glabra 'Roseworthy'

Eremophila glabra 'Roseworthy'

This is another of those tough glabra forms. This one originates from the Roseworthy district which is north of Adelaide in South Australia, on the road to the Barossa Valley. Many forms of native plants are named for the town or district where they grow and this is particularly so of Eremophilas.

This form of Eremophila glabra is quite flat like a lawn. In fact a well grown plant has the fresh green appearance of lawn and I am sure could be grown as a lawn substitute. It would only be visually like that as it could not be walked on like a lawn. However to have a flat green area is visually cooling even if it is not a true lawn. The plant would be worth growing for that alone. However another benefit is that Honeyeaters love the flowers which vary from yellow to red on the plant when in flower. This is a frost hardy plant also.

Chloris truncata (Windmill Grass)

Chloris truncata (late summer)

Chloris truncata (late summer)

My original idea with this grass was to test its hardiness and suitability as a lawn grass.

After I decided to not water a patch until it became unacceptable as a lawn to test the time between waterings, we had 3.5 mm of rain. This was three and a half weeks between waterings and was almost at the stage of considering it to be in need of a watering. As a general rule I would say that 3 weekly intervals would keep a reasonable greenness about the grass. It is looking a bit tatty at the moment as it hasn’t been trimmed since late spring. We have also had many days above 35C and at least ten days above 40C.

I certainly think it is worth persevering with this grass in low rainfall areas, especially in areas where it occurs naturally.

See here for other posts on this topic.

Olearia passerinoides (Daisy Bush)

Olearia passerinoides

Olearia passerinoides

Olearia passerinoides flowers during the summer here. The white flowers are about the size of a 10 cent coin. Not spectacular but the white flowers on bright green bushes bring a sense of freshness and coolness to the hot summer days.

This plant is native to the district and is drought and lime tolerant. They are shrubs to about 3 metres tall and 2 metres wide. Not much study has been done on Olearias and their cultivation. The dryland plants need to be pruned to prevent the flowers appearing on the whispy ends of foliage. New growth appears low down in the bush and pruning can be done at these points to force out more dense foliage and create a tidier bush.

Daisy bushes attract butterflies and the birds that chase them. The birds in our yard use the bushes as staging posts to come down to the bird baths.