Archive for the 'Daisies' Category

Olearia passerinoides

Olearia passerinoides (Daisy Bush)

Olearia passerinoides (Daisy Bush)

Olearia passerinoides is a mallee daisy and is quite a large bush with bright  green leaves, different to many mallee daisies which often have grey green leaves. Although this is a shrub, to me it behaves as a perennial shrub, in that new growth appears along the older wood.

The bush has a tendency to become scruffy, with the leaves higher up the stems and the flowers also high. If it was cut back to the lower growths, it would have dense foliage and be a more compact plant, and I suspect the flowering would also be quite spectacular.

As usual, I promise myself that I will do this, and yet another season goes buy. Mine have just finished flowering, so out with the secateurs tomorrow, while I think of it.

Olearia passerinoides is drought, lime and frost tolerant. It has clusters of small white daisies and grows to 2-3m tall by about 1.5-2m wide if left to its own devices. Pruning will keep it to a more compact size.

Calocephalus lacteus (Milky Beauty-heads)

Calocephalus lacteus (Milky Beauty-heads)

Calocephalus lacteus (Milky Beauty-heads)

Calocephalus lacteus is a small spreading plant with small, globular, whitish flower heads in late spring and summer. The photo was taken in early January in Canberra Botanic Gardens.

The plant suckers, growing 10-30 cm tall by 1-1.5 metres wide. It is hardy in most situations, prefers moist soil but withstands periods of dryness. It grows in full sun to part shade in sand loam or clay that is well drained. It would need some water during the summer in low rainfall areas.

Calocephalus citreus (Lemon Beauty-heads)

Calocephalus citreus (Lemon Beauty-heads)

Calocephalus citreus (Lemon Beauty-heads)

Calocephalus citreus is a small member of the daisy family, growing 20-50 cm high by 30-60 cm wide. It has silver grey foliage and small, yellow button type flowerheads in late Spring to Summer. The photo was taken in early January at Canberra Botanic Gardens.

This plant is perennial and should be pruned after flowering when new growths begin near the base of the plant.  It is hardy in most situations and withstands dry periods.

I would call it a drought tolerant plant when I observe its survival here. It grows in loam and sand, in half to full sun, including dappled sun.

This attractive daisy dries well for use in flower arrangements.

Daisies in Cottage Gardens

Chrysocephalum semipapposum (Clustered Everlasting)

Chrysocephalum semipapposum (Clustered Everlasting)

A cottage garden is the ideal garden for many of the Australian native daisies. Chrysocephalum semipapposum (Clustered Everlasting) was growing in Canberra Botanic Gardens in a wild bush gardens which could have been turned into a cottage garden with its random planting arrangements.

The photo shows the ‘natural’ looking effect that can be achieved by planting several plants of a species in an irregular grouping, with other plants of different form, leaf and flower colour, and height.

Chrysocephalum semipapposum (Clustered Everlasting)

Chrysocephalum semipapposum (Clustered Everlasting)

Chrysocephalum semipapposum (Clustered Everlasting)

This is one of my favourite plants and it is a member of the daisy family. Members of  The Daisy Study Group had several forms of Chrysocephalum semipapposum growing. Chrysocephalum used to be Helichrysm.

It is a variable species with grey to green leaves which vary in width from quite fine to a coarser leaved form. It has clusters of small yellow flowers, which, if picked quite early in the flowering stage, will keep as an everlasting. If picked to late the flower will continue to open and the seeds will fluff out.

The plants grow from 50-80cm tall and make clumps up to a metre wide. Flowering is from Spring through to autumn so they are good value in the garden, especially in a cottage garden setting. The plants shoot from the bottom, so when the first signs of shooting appear, it is time to chop the clumps back to the new growth.

This plant is hardy in most situations and grows in full sun to filtered or part sun. It withstands periods of dryness but does best with extra moisture. The plant is suitable for heavy clay, loams and sand.